Should politicians learn to program?

In the modern world, there are more and more problems related to technology. Therefore, the question arises, should politicians learn to program? Could knowledge about application development have a beneficial effect on the development of the country’s processes?

Technologically illiterate generation

Most members of Parliament are largely technologically illiterate. Otherwise, they are not to be blamed for this, if we consider the demographic data of the parliament. Based on a survey from 2017, the average age in parliament is 50.8 years, and the ages range all the way up to 70 years. It is therefore a population that did not grow up with technology. Electronic devices that we take for granted these days were introduced to them later in life. So it is no wonder that they are also more difficult to understand than those who grew up with technology.

But should we even understand the technology?

Of course! The latter would contribute to a better understanding of such common problems related to the field of technology. As a result, it would be easier to make correct, high-quality decisions. As for programming… it would be good to at least get to know the basics. In this way, they would learn critical and creative thinking, which is essential in programming. A programmer basically solves problems, step by step. He breaks down a big problem into smaller ones and initially looks for answers to them so that he can then arrive at a “master answer” that is expressed in the form of a useful and functional end product. At the same time, he is constantly trying to make something better. Probably, the explanation of why such thinking would benefit our politicians is not necessary.

Prospects for the future

There is a lot of evidence of successful self-taught people who learned programming independently and for free. The latter was achieved with the help of the Internet, namely by taking online courses, reading articles, joining forums and groups, etc. So nowadays, there is practically no excuse for not being able to learn programming due to cost or unavailability of data. Nevertheless, we believe that politicians will not accept this call and will not learn to program for quite some time. However, this does not mean that we are pessimistic about the future. The previously mentioned generation of politicians will not stay in their positions forever and a younger generation will succeed them. One who grew up with technology and understands it. Undoubtedly, there will be many programmers among them, as the number of people receiving training in this field is growing day by day. We are so positive about the future and believe that soon there will be more programmer types among politicians who will be able to apply the programmer’s way of thinking to the social system and political decisions.